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From the blog

Elizabeth King’s writes about the Bach Cello Suites

Notes on the Bach Suites – By Elizabeth King Despite their fame and popularity, the six suites on tonight’s program have a foggy origin. They were written sometime between 1717 and 1723 during Bach’s service to Prince Leopold in Cöthen. At this period of the Baroque, the cello would have been[…]

Chamber Music Big and Small

– by CMSCVA Artistic Director James Wilson It’s summer time, and for a classical musician that usually means festival time, a point in the year where I put aside my usual projects and groups, and play with a more diverse group of colleagues in far-flung places. If you’re lucky like[…]

Notes on our Feb 9 concert, “The French Connection.”

Notes on the “The French Connection.”                      – by Carsten Schmidt The first half of the seventeenth century saw the evolution of a particularly French way of composing music for solo harpsichord.  It was by no means the first time the harpsichord was elevated to solo status, nor was it the[…]

An Interview with Harpsichordist Carsten Schmidt

– by CMSCVA Artistic Director James Wilson Carsten Schmidt will be performing two concerts of solo music for harpsichord, on February 8 and 9, 2014. This is the first time CMSCVA has presented a recital composed exclusively of early keyboard music. We thought we would interview Carsten and hear some[…]

Notes on our January 7 concert, “The End of Time”

– By James Wilson, CMSCVA Artistic Director The “Quartet for the End of Time” is one of the most famous chamber music compositions of all time, and the musical work that inspired tonight’s program. In their own way, each piece on the program seems to reach out beyond our own[…]

Notes on our January 5 concert, “Time”

– By James Wilson, CMSCVA Artistic Director I know, I know….The concept of musical programming around the concept of “time” seems obvious. What is music anyway but the ordering of sounds in time? But the more I thought of the concept as a way to organize this season’s Society concerts,[…]

Roger Zare’s thoughts on his quintet inspired by time dilation!

 Our concert on January 5 features a thrilling and unusual quintet by American composer Roger Zare, inspired by the theories of Albert Einstein. It fits perfectly into our theme of “Time,” as you can read in Roger’s own words: “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” is titled after Albert Einstein’s famous 1905[…]